Via Panoramica: Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos / A Journal of Anglo-American Studies https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP <p><em>Via Panoramica: Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos/ A Journal of Anglo-American Studies</em> (ISSN: 2182-9934) is published by CETAPS (Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies), at the Faculty of Letters of the University of Porto. The journal, which is published twice a year, welcomes essays in Portuguese or in English, within the field of Anglo-American Studies, proposed preferentially by early-career researchers, from post-graduate students to researchers who have recently obtained their PhD degrees. <em>Via Panoramica </em>has a Scientific Committee which ensures double blind peer-review of the texts submitted for publication. </p> pt-PT marciadianalemos@gmail.com (Márcia Lemos) mselas@letras.up.pt (Mariana Selas) Thu, 16 Dec 2021 16:42:50 +0000 OJS 3.3.0.3 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 A Prefatory Note https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11084 <p>.</p> Márcia Lemos Direitos de Autor (c) 2021 Via Panoramica: Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos / A Journal of Anglo-American Studies https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11084 Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0000 O Estado das Ciências Sociais e Humanas nos EUA durante a 2.ª Guerra Mundial https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11085 <p>.</p> João Sottomayor Fernandes Direitos de Autor (c) 2021 Via Panoramica: Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos / A Journal of Anglo-American Studies https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11085 Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Almost the same but not quite https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11086 <p>This article analyzes, through a postcolonial perspective, the literary works Foe and Youth, both written by J. M. Coetzee. It problematizes the concept of mimicry as presented by Homi K. Bhabha in his essay “Of mimicry and man: The ambivalence of colonial discourse”. Analyzing the actions of the characters John and Friday, it becomes possible to perceive how they resort to strategies of mimicry and attempt to resist Western discourses of power. Consequently, they present themselves as disruptive and subversive in a cultural space traditionally imbedded with colonial authority.</p> Jéssica Bispo Direitos de Autor (c) 2021 Via Panoramica: Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos / A Journal of Anglo-American Studies https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11086 Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Breaking the Borders of Fantasy https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11087 <p>As the genre of fantasy literature continues to grow, new authors strive to innovate and stray from the traditional principles that ruled it for many decades when epic fantasy was more prominent. Though epic features still remain a great part of the genre, the characteristics that rule fantasy worlds, stories, and characters have changed over time, bringing new aspects into the fold and introducing new voices. As academics attempt to categorize a genre as diverse as fantasy to better understand it and define it, authors continue to expand and mingle fantasy elements with components from other genres, especially science-fiction. The aim of this article is to identify how a taxonomy of fantasy can be used to understand the relation between the fantastic and the narrative. By analyzing N. K. Jemisin’s novels in the Broken Earth trilogy through Farah Mendlesohn’s categorization of fantasy proposed in Rhetorics of Fantasy (2008), the goal is to discover the aspects in which Jemisin brings innovation into the fantasy genre by applying elements from various categories.</p> Rui Mateus Direitos de Autor (c) 2021 Via Panoramica: Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos / A Journal of Anglo-American Studies https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11087 Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0000 “How Does The Never To Be Differ From What Never Was?” https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11089 <p>The haunting presence of memories and dreams from an unregenerate past society thoroughly permeate the action of Cormac McCarthy’s vision of the post-apocalypse in The Road. Besides the intention of contrasting the barrenness of the world that the protagonists inhabit with the lively imagery of the old world, the recollections that invade the father’s inner self provide a clash between personal and collective narratives which push him to struggle for survival and protect his son in an effort to “carry the fire” of humanity. Parallelly, the symbolism of the dreams that we encounter throughout the novel hold valuable clues that can be accessed to resolve the ambiguous closure to The Road. In the first part of this paper, I will revisit the field of memory studies to reveal the importance that memory holds as a provider of meaning for life in the apocalypse. The second part of the article develops a theory that absolutely disregards any optimistic reading of the end of the novel, as it presents us with the possibility that what we read in the last pages of the book constitutes the wish-fulfilment produced by the boy’s dying dream. To investigate this enticing theory that was furthered by Jacob M. Powning, I will assess this hypothesis through the lenses of Psychoanalysis. McCarthy’s interest in the psychoanalytic studies, and his fascination with the dream world will help to develop a pertinent proposition that seeks to ultimately resolve the enigmatic Deus Ex-Machina that closes the novel.</p> Diogo Barbieri Direitos de Autor (c) 2021 Via Panoramica: Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos / A Journal of Anglo-American Studies https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11089 Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Mundus Vult Decipi https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11090 <p>In this article I examine the ways in which the competitive reality television franchise RuPaul’s Drag Race (RPDR), immensely popular with Western LGBTQ+-communities, can be considered a product of what Theodor W. Adorno and Max Horkheimer identified as the Culture Industry (CI). On the one hand, this allows for a concrete application of the CI-thesis and the exploration of possible lines of critique concerning RPDR and its effects on its viewership, while, on the other hand, it is an opportunity to evaluate the aptitude of the CI-thesis for critical analysis in the 21st century. While the concepts related to the CI-thesis turn out to be remarkably productive, its latent totalitarian and pessimistic framework tends to skew any analysis. This may warrant supplementing its coarse-grained perspective with a more fine-grained empirical investigation</p> Eelke André Verhagen Direitos de Autor (c) 2021 Via Panoramica: Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos / A Journal of Anglo-American Studies https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11090 Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0000 Volume completo https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11091 <p>.</p> Via Panoramica Direitos de Autor (c) 2021 Via Panoramica: Revista de Estudos Anglo-Americanos / A Journal of Anglo-American Studies https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://ojs.letras.up.pt/index.php/VP/article/view/11091 Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:00:00 +0000